The Power of Girl Scouting

The Power of Girl Scouting

By Shayla Scarlett
Girl Scouts is celebrating its 101st birthday today! What an amazing accomplishment for the advancement of women and girls.
The value of Girl Scouting has been far-reaching and will continue to be relevant in helping to transform today’s girls into tomorrow’s leaders. Some of our most prominent women in our society were Girl Scouts, including Hillary Clinton, Barbara Walters, Katie Couric, Gloria Steinem, Mae Jemison, Venus Williams and Mariah Carey.
Did you know that through participation in Girl Scouting, alumnae display positive life outcomes to a greater degree than non-alumnae with regard to several indicators of success, including:
Sense of self – Of Girl Scout alumnae, 63 percent consider themselves competent and capable, compared to the 55 percent of non-alumnae (Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact Study, 2012).
Volunteerism and community work – Of Girl Scout alumnae who are mothers, 66 percent have been a mentor/volunteer in their child’s youth organization, compared to the 48 percent of non-alumnae mothers.
Civic engagement – Of Girl Scout alumnae, 77 percent vote regularly
Education – Of Girl Scout alumnae, 38 percent have attained college degrees, compared to 28 percent of non-alumnae.
Income/socioeconomic status – Girl Scout alumnae report a significantly higher household income ($51,700) than non-alumnae ($42,200).

As a product of the Girl Scout movement, my involvement in Girl Scouts helped me learn to use my resources wisely; taught me to advocate for myself and others; equipped me with the skills and desire to take action in my community; nurtured my sense of adventure; and gave me the opportunity to explore and try new things. I am a Girl Scout, always and forever.